:: Volume 7, Issue 3 (May & Jun 2017) ::
J Research Health 2017, 7(3): 841-849 Back to browse issues page
Comparison of early maladaptive schemas and psychological well-being in women undergoing cosmetic surgery and normal women
Moslem Abbasi , Arash Aghighi , Parviz Porzoor , Mojtaba Dehqan
Department of Psychology and Educational Science, Faculty of Educational Sciences and Psychology, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Ardabil, Iran
Abstract:   (565 Views)

Literature review shows that cosmetic surgery demand is often a consequence of psychological distress. The purpose of this study was to compare early maladaptive schemas and psychological well-being in women who undergo cosmetic surgery versus normal women. This was a causal-comparative study in which, the statistical population included all individuals intended to have cosmetic surgery reffered to private clinics of the city of Arak for six months in late 2014 and early 2015 (N=1000). Among them, 40 women was selected as the experimental group. A control group matched with the experimenta group consisted of 40 women of normal subjects was also selected according to the convenience sampling. Data were collected using scales of early maladaptive schemas and psychological well-being. The results indicated a significant difference between the two groups of surgical patients and normal participants in terms of maladaptive schemas .In addition, there was a significant difference between the two groups in terms of psychological well-being. The women who undergo cosmetic surgery had more early maladaptive schemas probably deu to psychological problems and negative attitudes toward their physical conditions. They had low levels of psychological well-being because of the attitude toward their appearance.
 

Keywords: Cosmetic Surgery, Maladaptive, Schemas, Psychological
Full-Text [PDF 382 kb]   (261 Downloads)    
Type of Study: Orginal Article | Subject: Applicable
Received: 2014/11/24 | Accepted: 2015/05/9 | Published: 2017/04/24



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Volume 7, Issue 3 (May & Jun 2017) Back to browse issues page